Good Credit Game

$249.00
Shipping:
Calculated at Checkout
Version:
1.0
Publication date:
February 1, 2014
Reading level:
5th-grade or below (Flesch-Kincaid model)
For ages:
18+ (college, military, young adult, and adults)
The Good Credit Game is a complete teaching toolkit and includes enough materials for a whole class. Packages are available for classes of 10, 20 or 30 students.

The Good Credit Game is a complete financial education package. It makes it fun and easy to teach classes on credit reports, credit scores and credit cards. It's designed for young adults and adults (18 and older). (On our specific website for the teaching kit, you can find much more information about The Good Credit Game -- including a sample download from the curriculum guide.)

With its collaborative, hands-on activities, the Good Credit Game is a welcome break from PowerPoint, worksheets and lectures. It gets people engaged and wanting to learn more and take action to improve their credit. You'll like teaching from this credit curriculum and students will like learning from it! The "teach out of the box" and "learn as you go" format means you can use it in credit classes – even if you aren't an expert on credit reports and credit repair.

The flexible materials allow you to pick and choose which credit lessons you use – or you can use them all together for a fun, effective credit class that's a snap to plan and teach. Designed for financial literacy classes, the credit curriculum has two parts:

  • Part I is a series of six interrelated teaching modules (5-20 minutes each).
  • Part II is an instructional board game (30-60 minutes) that dispels credit myths and reinforces credit facts.

Also included are a variety of in-class discussions and additional activities. Among the topics covered in this comprehensive credit class are:

  • What is credit and why good credit matters?
  • What's in a credit or loan application versus what's in a credit report?
  • What does a credit report look like? How credit reports are used outside of loans and credit (landlords, employment, etc.)?
  • How to request your credit report and fix mistakes?
  • How does a credit report becomes a FICO credit score; what are the components of a credit score?
  • What does a credit score mean?
  • How bad credit makes things more expensive; how does good credit make things more affordable?

There are Good Credit Game packages for three different sizes of classes: class of 10, 20 or 30. If you have one class of 30 people, you should use the version for 30 people. If your organization has three locations, and each one has a class of 10 people, use three packages for 10 people.

Written entirely at a 5th-grade reading level to make the material accessible to all audiences, this financial education package contains:

  • A sturdy, polyester carrying bag. The bag lets you easily carry the game from class to class in lieu of lugging around a bulky box. A zipper keeps everything together and prevents pieces from getting lost.
  • Two-sided game boards (1 board per group of 2-6 students; 2 are included for a class of 10; 4 for a class of 20; 6 for a class of 30)
  • One comprehensive instructor's guide with more than 150 pages. (This is not written at 5th-grade.) Besides easy instructions and lesson plans, it includes dozens of mini-lessons and information on credit.
  • Set of 200 question cards, for use with the board game (or on their own). The questions cover myths and facts about credit reports, credit scores and credit cards. (Each card is clearly marked as a basic or more advanced question.)
  • Set of 20 special discussion cards.
  • 10 sets of Build-a-Person cards (including adult and young adult characters)
  • Reusable simplified credit reports (10 are included for a class of 10 students; 20 for a class of 20; 30 for a class of 30)
  • Cost of Credit slide calculators; demonstrate how different credit scores result in different rates and, thus, different monthly payments (10 are included for a class of 10 students; 20 for a class of 20; 30 for a class of 30)
  • Noisemaker bells for each group (2 are included for a class of 10 students; 4 for a class of 20; 6 for a class of 30)
  • Game pieces in different colors (10 are included for a class of 10 students; 20 for a class of 20; 30 for a class of 30)
  • Dice for each group (2 are included for a class of 10 students; 4 for a class of 20; 6 for a class of 30)

See how the Good Credit Game integrates with the most popular national financial literacy standards.